Trey Thompson: Tyler Technologies

Graphic designed by Baillee Furst

 

What is he up to?

Trey Thompson ’19 spent his summer interning for Tyler Technologies located in Ames, Iowa. Tyler Technologies provides integrated software and technology services to the public sector. At Simpson, Thompson is majoring in mathematics with a double minor in secondary education and coaching.

 

How did he hear about the internship opportunity?

Trey was able to land the internship through connections within his family. His grandfather formerly worked there and his mother presently works at Tyler Technologies.

 

What does a typical day include at his internship?

Thompson stated, “I showed up at 8 am and worked until 5 most days. I usually ran errands for everyone, bought new supplies needed for our new building we moved into, and organized the company database.”

 

What has been his favorite aspect of the internship?

Thompson’s favorite experiences at his internship included socializing with other co-workers and working in the new building.

 

What is the biggest takeaway from his internship/how will this internship benefit his future?

Thompson proclaimed, “This internship taught me how to analyze data and use excel to organize and represent the data to present to others in the company.”

 

What are his future plans?

In the future, Trey aspires to graduate from Simpson College and become a high school math teacher and cross country coach.

 

What advice does he have for Simpson students regarding internships?

Trey advises students to, “Make it a goal to work at an internship site before graduation. The work experience provides helpful skills in your field and also demonstrates a typical work environment.”

 

Transfer To Simpson College

Simpson College Adds Sports Communication & Interactive Media Programs

Photo by Daniel Williams via Creative Commons

Multimedia Communication at Simpson College is expanding student opportunities with new majors and minor in Sports Communication and Interactive Media.

The Simpson faculty approved the new programs last spring, and students can now begin declaring the new majors and minors.

Multimedia Communication chair Brian Steffen says the new majors will help students prepare for the changing world of media and communication.

“We think both of these majors are in new and growing fields that are very popular to students on campus and thinking about attending Simpson,” Steffen said.

The Multimedia Communication faculty also want to make it easy for current students in the current programs of Multimedia Journalism and Public Relations to transition into the new areas of study.

Taia Veren, a Simpson junior whose major is Public Relations, began her Interactive Media minor this semester. She says she’s adding it to get and edge in marketable job skills.

“I think interactive media will make me stand out, because I won’t just be a writer or a speaker,” she said. “I’ll have design and technical skills that will help me to be more marketable than someone without a variety of skills.”

Steffen said Simpson is one of two schools in Iowa offering Interactive Media and that there are no other Sports Communication programs in the state.

Along with making Simpson a unique place to study Multimedia Communication, Steffen said the new programs increased interest in the department among prospective students.

“Our interest in Multimedia Communication among students enrolling at Simpson College generally has increased by about 50 percent in the past year,” he said.

Steffen said the Multimedia Communication faculty hope the new areas of study will keep students enthusiastic about their professional futures.

Nick Joslyn: Green Bank Observatory

 

What was he up to?

Nick Joslyn ’18 spent his summer performing research for the Green Bank Observatory located in Green Bank, West Virginia. Green Bank Observatory is a research facility for radio astronomy, where the renowned Green Bank Telescope is located. Nick is pursuing a double major in Physics and Mathematics with a minor in Computer Science at Simpson College.

How did he hear about the internship with Green Bank Observatory?

Joslyn responded, “Following my senior year of high school, I attended the National Youth Science Camp in West Virginia. As part of the experience, we took a tour of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (now known as the Green Bank Observatory). The science conducted and the technology employed at GBO is unmatched. Now of eligible age, I applied to their REU (Research Experience for Undergraduates) program.”

What did a typical day include at his site?

According to Joslyn, his research project, at its essence was, “attempting to improve detection techniques of the Green Bank Radio Telescopes. Specifically, we tried to eliminate radio frequency interference (cell phone signals, GPS signals, SIRIUS radio, etc.).  As a result, my work involved heavy computation. However, I was not limited to writing code. Due to the nature of my project, I met with software engineers, electrical engineers, and astronomers to discuss approaches.”

Typically, he arrived to work at around 8:30AM. In the mid-morning, he participated in a discussion/meeting with his mentor and the other active members of the project. The work day generally concluded around 5-5:30PM, but he was often “so engrossed in [his] work that [he] stayed much later.”

In addition, Joslyn stated, “All of the summer students were provided workstations in the reference library of the laboratory, engendering thoughtful inter-project discussion. Furthermore, the scientific staff was eager and willing to help with any difficulties we experience. It was an excellent environment to work.”

What was his favorite aspect of the experience?

Joslyn commented, “I will answer this in two ways. First was the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) itself. The GBT is the world’s largest fully steerable telescope. The dish is 100 meters across, and the structure itself is 485 feet tall. Not to mention, in all, the GBT is 16 million pounds. Seeing the GBT juxtaposed against the West Virginia landscape never ceased to amaze.

On a more practical level, my favorite aspect of the experience was the intrinsic motivation I gained by working on a project that has such grand applications. The program has the potential to improve detection techniques. If successful, it could be used by every astronomer using the Green Bank Telescopes.” 

What was the biggest takeaway from his experience?

Joslyn expressed, “Although there are many, the single most important take away from this experience was scientific computing ability. Not only did I learn new coding languages and operating systems, but more importantly, I was exposed to unique and novel scientific ways of utilizing computers. I plan to apply these methods to current research projects I am involved in at Simpson.”

What are his future plans?

Joslyn divulged, “Almost immediately following the conclusion of my summer research project at Green Bank Observatory, I began preseason for Soccer. Upon return to Indianola, I picked up several of the research projects that had been put on hold for the summer.

Looking further ahead, in mid-September, I will take the Physics GRE. Following my senior year at Simpson, I plan to attend graduate school, likely in physics, applied physics, or materials science.”

What advice does he have for Simpson students regarding gaining experience?

Joslyn’s advice to all Simpson students is that he highly recommends research and internships. “Not only (depending on the location) do you earn money, but you also get to experience the institution. More specifically, to the science students, apply to REUs. The selection process is very competitive, but the rewards are great. The education you receive at Simpson makes your application of interest to selection committees. The opportunities for independent research, collaborative/interdisciplinary research, and club participation provided by Simpson can only enhance your resume.”

Lab 02 Images from CMSC 150 Intro to Programming

All these images were created by students in CMSC 150 Introduction to Programming class. This is the second week lab. The first week was spent learning version control system basics, and how to run a program in PyCharm. Each line, circle, and square is created by a code using the Python programming language and the Arcade library. Click on an image to zoom in and see the detail.

 

Sadie Timms: University of Northern Colorado Cancer Rehabilitation Institute (UNCCRI)

Edited by Baillee Furst, Simpson College Career Development Social Media Coordinator

 

What was she up to?

Sadie Timms (Dec ’17) worked as a Cancer Exercise Specialist medically screening clients, completing  psychological and physiological (exercise) assessments, creating exercise prescriptions, and implementing the exercise prescription in an exercise intervention. Timms also served as one of two intern supervisors. Her job was to close the clinic as well as check all of the assessments and reassessments over the summer. Over the course of the summer she had the opportunity to teach professionals in the medical field (PT’s and OT’s) about our job and how to do it as well as assist in training the incoming intern team. At the end of her internship she had the opportunity to take an assessment skills test, which she passed. Timm is now a Clinical Cancer Exercise Specialist Level 2.

 

How did she find out about the internship?

In her search for an internship, Timms talked to professors (at Simpson and ISU), contacted students and professionals in the field of exercise science, and used google. She had another student tell her to google what she was interested in doing.

Timms said, “I had already completed a cardiac rehab internship, but knew I am also passionate about cancer. I googled oncology rehabilitation internships and found a PT clinic based out of Denver named oncology rehab. Their clinic however uses protocols from UNCCRI and cited them on their website. I saw they offered internships every semester, called to make sure there were spots still available (thankfully there were – although only 2), and applied that day.”

What strengths did Sadie demonstrate during her experience?

“I believe I used my leadership skills, showed initiative, and worked really hard during my time at UNCCRI. These skills are what helped me to be an intern supervisor, they helped me gain the trust and respect of my superiors, and they helped me pass my certification exam.”

 

For this internship she showed up a week early to gain skills that she was unable to learn during the spring semester, since she is an out of state student.

 

“We were required to get 500 hours and by the end I had 700 hours. Whenever anyone needed help be it a fellow specialist or my boss I made it a priority to help them or do a great job at whatever they asked me to do. I knew going into the test I was at a disadvantage because the majority of our specialist team had taken a class over the information and I had not. I studied hard, made note cards, asked questions, and talked through the information to make sure I knew it and was prepared.”

 

Why does Sadie feel the internship was important?

Timms believes this internship was important because cancer rehab is only at its beginning and has so much more growing to do and more people to help in the future, and she is at the forefront of this.

 

“When I tell people what I did most have never heard of anything like it and I hope to be a part of changing this in the future and helping grow both the field of cancer rehabilitation and exercise rehabilitation in general for special populations. These services and exercise physiologists aren’t even covered by insurance like cardiac rehab and pulmonary rehab. Why is exercise for cancer, diabetes, elderly, and other populations who may need extra help and consideration any different?”

 

What are her next steps?

Right now, she is finishing her music degree at Simpson and running her last season of cross country. She is also hoping to work this fall using the skills she learned over the summer in a gym or clinic setting. She has also started the process of applying for graduate schools to study clinical exercise physiology with emphasis on special populations; all with the goal of opening her own clinic in the future or becoming a clinical coordinator at another. She hopes in the next 5-10 or even 15 years these services will be recognized by the government and healthcare system as valuable and to be covered by insurance.

 

Sadie Timms: University of Northern Colorado Cancer Rehabilitation Institute (UNCCRI)

Edited by Baillee Furst, Simpson College Career Development Social Media Coordinator

 

What was she up to?

Sadie Timms (Dec ’17) worked as a Cancer Exercise Specialist medically screening clients, completing  psychological and physiological (exercise) assessments, creating exercise prescriptions, and implementing the exercise prescription in an exercise intervention. Timms also served as one of two intern supervisors. Her job was to close the clinic as well as check all of the assessments and reassessments over the summer. Over the course of the summer she had the opportunity to teach professionals in the medical field (PT’s and OT’s) about our job and how to do it as well as assist in training the incoming intern team. At the end of her internship she had the opportunity to take an assessment skills test, which she passed. Timm is now a Clinical Cancer Exercise Specialist Level 2.

 

How did she find out about the internship?

In her search for an internship, Timms talked to professors (at Simpson and ISU), contacted students and professionals in the field of exercise science, and used google. She had another student tell her to google what she was interested in doing.

Timms said, “I had already completed a cardiac rehab internship, but knew I am also passionate about cancer. I googled oncology rehabilitation internships and found a PT clinic based out of Denver named oncology rehab. Their clinic however uses protocols from UNCCRI and cited them on their website. I saw they offered internships every semester, called to make sure there were spots still available (thankfully there were – although only 2), and applied that day.”

What strengths did Sadie demonstrate during her experience?

“I believe I used my leadership skills, showed initiative, and worked really hard during my time at UNCCRI. These skills are what helped me to be an intern supervisor, they helped me gain the trust and respect of my superiors, and they helped me pass my certification exam.”

 

For this internship she showed up a week early to gain skills that she was unable to learn during the spring semester, since she is an out of state student.

 

“We were required to get 500 hours and by the end I had 700 hours. Whenever anyone needed help be it a fellow specialist or my boss I made it a priority to help them or do a great job at whatever they asked me to do. I knew going into the test I was at a disadvantage because the majority of our specialist team had taken a class over the information and I had not. I studied hard, made note cards, asked questions, and talked through the information to make sure I knew it and was prepared.”

 

Why does Sadie feel the internship was important?

Timms believes this internship was important because cancer rehab is only at its beginning and has so much more growing to do and more people to help in the future, and she is at the forefront of this.

 

“When I tell people what I did most have never heard of anything like it and I hope to be a part of changing this in the future and helping grow both the field of cancer rehabilitation and exercise rehabilitation in general for special populations. These services and exercise physiologists aren’t even covered by insurance like cardiac rehab and pulmonary rehab. Why is exercise for cancer, diabetes, elderly, and other populations who may need extra help and consideration any different?”

 

What are her next steps?

Right now, she is finishing her music degree at Simpson and running her last season of cross country. She is also hoping to work this fall using the skills she learned over the summer in a gym or clinic setting. She has also started the process of applying for graduate schools to study clinical exercise physiology with emphasis on special populations; all with the goal of opening her own clinic in the future or becoming a clinical coordinator at another. She hopes in the next 5-10 or even 15 years these services will be recognized by the government and healthcare system as valuable and to be covered by insurance.

 

Directions for uploading “Unlisted” MM pre-screening videos

We prefer to receive links to YouTube videos rather than large video/audio files, as it eliminates any format reading issues. We recommend uploading your files to YouTube as “unlisted”; this allows us to view them when provided the link, but does not make them public.

Audition links should be e-mailed to gradmusic@simpson.edu

How to upload an Unlisted YouTube video:

An unlisted video is different than a private video. “Unlisted” means that only people who know the link to the video can view it (such as friends, family, or institutions to whom you send the link). An unlisted video will not appear in any of YouTube’s public spaces (such as search results, your channel, or the Browse page). An unlisted video is different to a private video because you don’t need a YouTube account to watch the video (all you need is the link) and there’s no 50 person sharing limit.

You can choose to make any of your uploads an unlisted video in your YouTube Account settings. Here’s how:

  1. Sign into or create your YouTube Account
  2. Go to your My Channel page
  3. If you need to upload a video, click on the upload arrow in the upper right banner and skip to step 5.
  4. If you want to edit a video you’ve already uploaded, go to the Video Manager
  5. Select the video which you’d like to make an unlisted video. Click the Edit button to access the video’s settings.
  6. Go to the Privacy section of the page. There you’ll see the option to mark your video as “unlisted,” “public,” or “private.” Select unlisted.
  7. Don’t forget to click the Save Changes button. Once you’ve done this your video will be an unlisted video. 
  8. Copy the “Video URL” found to the right of the video in Video Manager (under “video information”) and send it to whomever you wish to be able to view the video.

Simpson student Kristen Alstott presents poster at the Midwestern Psychological Association conference in Chicago

Thanks to Simpson College’s travel funding for undergraduate research, Kristen Alstott was able to present her work at the Midwestern Psychological Association conference in Chicago. Below is her account of her experience:

Kristen Alstott presents her research at the Midwestern Psychological Association conference in Chicago

I presented my independent research from Advanced Research on the possibility of using diagrams and humorous cartoons in college textbooks to elicit greater reading comprehension for college students. This was my second year attending the Midwestern Psychological Association’s conference. Each year I am astounded by the number of students who attend and who remain passionate about research and the possibility of bettering the future.

I would like to focus my blog post on students who are interested in attending the conference. First of all, imagine presenting in a building with murals on ceilings, gold crown molding around every corner, and carpets with designs that will send your head spinning. Such sights will be a reality for you if you attend the conference because you will be presenting at the grand Palmer House in Chicago. For students who are nervous about presenting in front of large audiences, never fear. You will create a poster and present it in a room with about 80 other students who are also presenting around you. Therefore, it doesn’t feel so much like you are in the spotlight, and it instead feels like you are having very intimate conversations with interested researchers. Also, your presentation time is short, so you can present and then enjoy the rest of your day.

Perhaps one of the best parts about MPA is the chance to hear about cutting-edge research from across the country. In addition, you will have the opportunity to get helpful advice about future careers and applying to graduate school. The amount of amazing knowledge you can gain from going to the conference is outstanding!

The highlight of my trip was being asked to have my research cited in a book a professor at Grinnell College is writing. I worked on my independent research for a year, and I was absolutely elated to see someone so interested and excited about my research and hard work. Therefore, if you are considering the conference, please understand the amazing opportunities and doors that may open up for you because of your attendance. Not only will you get a chance to make a poster and practice your oratory skills, but you will get a chance to network with cutting-edge researchers who are passionate about fields that you are passionate about. Please don’t pass up this amazing challenge and experience to present at the Midwestern Psychological Association conference. You will not be disappointed!

Congratulations on your presentation, Kristen!

Simpson student Mary Hudson presents poster at the Midwestern Psychological Association conference in Chicago

Mary shares her story in a blog post here:

https://mpa2017simpson.wordpress.com/

Congratulations, Mary!