CATME Smarter Teamwork

This is a website designed for the purpose of assisting faculty in both creating groups/teams based on selected student characteristics, and providing feedback to the group members.

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Strengths:

Includes an informative 13-minute video that explains the uses for the site.

It was easy to request an account — it took less than 24 hours to receive a response that the account was ready. Once I had access, I clicked on the link, created a password and I was immediately ready to begin creating groups.

This site would be an excellent tool to use after reading the CL background information provided in another tool called Collaborative Learning: Group Work.

Concerns:

None at this time.

Recommendations:

Though I haven’t yet used this source, I have created an account with the expectation of using it in my upcoming course. I believe this will be a very helpful tool in creating groups with the right composition for effective collaboration. It will have the added benefit of giving students the feeling of legitimacy to the group-creation process. I also believe that students will find the feedback tool helpful in identifying the specific area(s) which they need to strengthen.

 

Doing Research: An Introduction to the Concepts of Online Searching

This is an animated, interactive tutorial module that introduces students to online searching. Sections include: 1. Using the search term AND, 2. Identifying keywords, 3. Thinking of synonyms and related terms, 4. Examining a citation, and 5. Putting it all together. Features interactive drag and drop “games” with immediate feedback.

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Strengths

The interactive nature of this tutorial hopefully reinforces understanding and reinforcement of material. It is not overtly university branded, so it could be easily adaptable for local needs.

Concerns

None

Recommendations for use

SC or 100 level students.

Scholarly vs. Popular Periodicals

This is a short, 3 minute animated tutorial video discussing the differences between scholarly and popular periodicals, and how to tell the difference. This is a great an introduction for 100 level students.

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Strengths

Quick and easily digestible. Clearly defines scholarly vs. popular periodicals, where to find them, and how they are different. Web video format is easily accessible for all users.

Concerns

None

Recommendations for use

All 100 level students.

University of Kent Teamworking Skills Assessment

University of Kent Teamworking Skills Assessment offers a 28-question survey to help assess collaboration, with some description of different roles folks often play in group meetings.

Go to Material

Strengths
looks quite straightforward

Concerns
British terms may be unfamiliar

Recommendations for use
Assessment and ongoing reflection

Mind Tools’ Team Effectiveness Assessment

Mind Tools Team Effectiveness Assessment is a short survey to gauge how effective team-building has been with some strategies for improvement.

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Strengths
easy to use; just click, click, and calculate, with feedback for every step

Concerns
assessments are somewhat generic

Recommendations for use
reflection and assessment

Collaborative Leadership Self-Reflection Guide

Overview:

This is a quantitative and qualitative resource guide for students to reflect on their collaborative leadership abilities.

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Strengths:

This guide provides an actual self-assessment exercise, as well as qualitative questions that students can answer about their collaborative leadership skills. It also provides brief information about emotional intelligence and social competence.

Concerns:

This material references a fishbowl activity, but it does not provide information about the roles student play for the exercise. The instructor can provide his or her own activity for students to reflect upon.

Recommendations for Use:

This resource could be used during multiple points of the semester as a part of the group reflection process. Students could track how their skills evolve and change as a result of their knowlegdge and experience .

Introduction to Self and Peer Assessment

Overview:

This resource provides guidance for faculty members to set up a group reflection process for both the student and his or her peers.

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Strengths:

This document begins with a table of contents which allows faculty members to easily access the section that is applicable to their work. It includes self-assessment prompts, as well as examples for how to construct a rubric.

Concerns:

Some of the information in this document is fairly basic and common; however, there are good prompts and tools within the information.

Recommendations for Use:

This material does not provide actual assessments or rubrics for faculty to use; rather, it provides research and questions for faculty to consider in order to create their own tools for student self and peer assessment.

 

Understanding the Stages of Group Formation

Overview:

This website has great information about the group process and different activities to engage in to improve the group process.

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Strengths:

This site has multiple exercises and resources related to leadership skills, decision making, project management, and time management. All of it is neatly organized in a bar on the left hand side of the side.

Concerns:

Some of the content is more explicitly related to the workplace as opposed to the classroom.

Recommendations for Use:

The diversity of materials on this site could be used for various projects. Overall, it will be helpful for students to reflect on their group process and how to process the obstacles they experience.

Mindflash (How to Prevent Social Loafing at the Office)

Overview:

Overview of Social Loafing (group members not doing their fair share), presented in a poster/handout format.  The poster/handout includes the categories of causes of SL, effects of SL, and preventing SL.

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Strengths:

Straight-forwarded, concise overview of the phenomenon of Social Loafing (which is the concept of individuals putting in less effort when in a group than when performing alone).  There is a visual chart that is in the form of a mini-poster that can be printed by the faculty member for easy distribution to students in order to discuss the importance of this phenomenon, and (most importantly) how to avoid it.

Concerns:

It is unclear who the source of this information is, but it was recommended to me by a site I use often that is set-up to provide free resources to teachers of Social Psychology (http://jfmueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/crow/) .

Recommendations:

Faculty should read this summary and consider each component before embarking on group projects in a course. It provides an easy to follow list of concerns that the faculty member and the group members can use to guide them.

 

Self Assessment / Peer Assessment

This is a self-assessment of skills in the following categories: Communication, Leadership, Relationships, Project Management, Productivity, & Personal Development. The assessment could also be used to assess a peer or a leader.

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Strengths

This is an easy-to-use pdf.  It covers several aspects of the collaborative leadership process.

Concerns

There are more categories and rating than a typical CL course would require.  It may be to broad in scope in the current form.  It may need to be scaled back to be effective for our CL courses.

Recommendations for use

First decide which categories are relevant to the course.  Consider using only the “skills” section that uses a Likert scale in the self-assessment at the end of the pdf.

Student could take part or the entirety of this assessment and share what they discovered about themselves. Ask them to decide how it applies to the current project.

Once the determination of which parts are applicable has been made, consider using this as  pre- and post- assessment for each individual or team.