Course Offerings

100 Level Courses

HIST 101 – History of Western Civilization I

A brief examination of cultural contributions of the ancient Middle East, followed by a survey of the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome and an investigation of the rise of Christianity.  A survey of the Middle Ages serves as a background for the development of European life culminating in the era of the Renaissance and Reformation.  CIVIC and CRITTHNK. 

HIST 102 – History of Western Civilization II

Beginning with the early modern era, the survey of Western civilization continues during the second semester with a consideration of the changes wrought by the Intellectual and Scientific Revolution, English ferment, the French Revolution, and the growth of modern industry and nationalism. The course concludes with an examination of the great world upheavals of the twentieth century.   CRITTHNK and CIVIC.

HIST 111  Reacting to the Past Western Civilization

This course is an introduction to the western tradition through reading, discussion, lecture, and historical simulation games.  Students will play one or more multi-week historical simulations as part of the course.  The course will cover the ancient Middle East, the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome, the development of Christianity, medieval Europe, and the Renaissance and Reformation.  COLLABLDR and ORALCOM. 

HIST 112 – Reacting to the Past Western Civilization II

This course is an introduction to the western tradition through reading, discussion, lecture, and historical simulation games. Students will play one or more multi-week historical simulations as part of the course. Beginning with the early modern era, the survey of Western civilization continues during the second semester with a consideration of the changes wrought by the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and the growth of modern industry and nationalism. The course concludes with an examination of the great world upheavals of the twentieth century. COLLABLDR and ORALCOM.

    • What’s the difference between HIST 101/102 and 111/112?   In 101/102, you’ll probably have a textbook, but you’ll also spend time reading and discussing primary sources. HIST 111/112 is taught in a ‘Great Books’ format where you read longer primary sources, including classic works on philosophy, religion and literature, and can expect to have lots of discussions as well as engage in a role-playing game.

HIST 170 - The Crusades

This course explores the nature and idea of the Crusades by examining their religious, political and cultural motivations and their effect they had on the people of Europe, Byzantium and the Islamic world.  The course culminates in an examination of the legacy of the Crusades and how later generations invoke their image and memory as inspiration. COLLABLDR

HIST 190 -- Special Topics (For these courses, preference given to first and second year students.)  

Spring 2015

World War II

This seminar examines the Second World War from a variety of angles, which provides an excellent introduction to the discipline of history as it is practiced at the college level. Students will be introduced to a variety of historical methodologies including document analysis, primary source research, and historical role-playing games. HISTRCL and INFOLIT.  

Fall 2015

Royal Murder Mystery

Two little boys, one a prince, the other an uncrowned king of England, disappeared from the Tower of London in 1483, never to be seen or heard from again. The man accused of their mysterious murder was none other than their uncle, the man who took the throne and made himself King of England, Richard III.  But no one has been able to prove that Richard actually did it. So here we have a real ‘whodunit’ that this course will attempt to unravel. You will explore the case, the cast of suspects and the relevant history to try to solve this murder mystery. Acting as detectives, you will examine the historical evidence, comb through contemporary documents, and question literature and historical interpretations to construct solutions to the mystery. 

Spring 2016

Cowboys and Indians

Cowboys and Indians" will examine frontier relations between white settlers and Native Americans from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries. Students will learn about King Philip's War, the Seminole Wars, and the Apache Wars among others. The centerpiece of the class will be a close examination of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown.


200 Level Courses

HIST 201 – US to 1877 

An examination of the forces which have shaped American history from the earliest colonial settlements to the Civil War.  Emphasis upon the American Revolution, the establishment of the government under the Constitution, and the succeeding political, social, and economic movements which culminated in the Civil War.  HISTRCL, and INFOLIT

HIST 202 –US Since 1877 

An introductory analysis of the factors, which have defined our history from the Reconstruction after the Civil War to America's position in the twentieth century.  Emphasis on industrialization, urbanization, and the emergence of the United States as a world power in the twentieth century.  HISTRCL and INFOLIT. 

HIST 211 African-American History

The history of the Black Americans is traced from the time of their appearance as slaves in the New World to the struggle for equality in the twentieth century. DIVRSTY

HIST 222  American Women’s History

This course treats women’s history as both an integral element of American history and as a unique subject of historical investigation.  Students will learn to think critically about how the category of gender interacts with class, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.   DIVRSTY. 

HIST 231 – England to 1688

This course will explore the development of England from the Norman conquest in 1066 to the Glorious Revolution in 1688. This period was fraught with changes as monarchs struggled to gain control of the unruly island and establish a powerful centralized monarch.  The primary focus of the course will be the political and religious interactions of the Crown, the Church and its nobility, and the contributions made towards the emergence of England as a Protestant constitutional monarchy.

HIST 232  England since 1688

A survey of English history from 1688 to present.  An examination of the Hanoverian monarchy, the growth of cabinet government, the development of political parties, the industrial revolution, the age of reform, and the expansion of Britain abroad.  The course concludes with a consideration of Britain's significance in the twentieth century.  CRITTHNK and HISTRCL

HIST 261  American Environmental History

This course deals with the interaction between people and the natural world in North America from colonial times to the present.  Various ideas of nature, the environmental consequences of European settlement, the spread of market agriculture, and the impact of industrialization are among the topics that will be examined.  CRITTHNK, HISTRCL, and INFOLIT.  Four credits.  Offered every other year.

HIST 240  The Medieval World

This course explores the development of medieval Europe following the fall of the Roman empire in the west. Why did feudalism develop and what did it mean for those who ruled, prayed and worked? What did it mean to be a king, a knight, a monk or a serf? How was power constructed and wielded by kings, the church and the people? What impact did the Black Death have on society? What role did faith play in the lives of medieval people? These are some of the questions that students will have the opportunity to explore through lecture, discussion and examination of primary sources.

HIST 241  The Early Modern World

This course will explore early modern Europe, c. 15th through 18th centuries, a period of fundamental transformations for the individual, the state and Christendom as a whole. Here the seeds of the modern world were sown. How did Renaissance ideas about the value of Man change and challenge one’s relationship with God, the state and each other? In what way did art bring human beings closer to God and each other? What was worth dying for in a world wracked by civil and religious war? How did politics affect the religious and vice versa? What impact did the discovery of ‘new’ worlds have on the imagination? These are some of the questions that students will have the opportunity to explore through lecture, discussion and examination of primary sources.  

HIST 275 – History of India

A survey of the history of the Indian subcontinent, with emphasis on the period from the Mughal Empire to independence and partition. Topics include Hindu and Muslim traditions, caste, imperialism, Indian nationalism, the life and ideas of Gandhi, and decolonization and its aftermath.   COLLABLDR, GLOBAL, and ORALCOM. 

HIST 276  History of China

An introduction to Chinese history and culture, with emphasis on the period from 1600-present. Topics covered include major religious and philosophical traditions, imperial dynasties, “opening” to the West, early 20th century political conflicts, civil war, Communist rule, and China’s place in the 21st century global economy.  WRITCOM, ORALCOM, and GLOBAL .  

HIST 290 – Special Topic:

Spring 2015

  • Rome 

This course is an overview of the city’s mythological founding and development into a republic. An emphasis will be placed upon the political and social aspects of its transition to an empire. The Empire will be studied for its longevity and as the birthplace of Christianity. The class concludes with an examination of Ancient Rome’s impact and continued influence on the modern world.


300 Level Courses

Hist 305 Renaissance and Reformation 1300-1648

The period of transition from medieval to modern times. Emphasis will be placed upon the origins of humanism, capitalism, and the nation state; the beginnings of modern science; the Protestant and Catholic Reformations; and the political and religious settlement at the end of the Thirty Years' War.   CRITTHNK, and HISTRCL.  

Hist 308 Nineteenth Century Europe 1789-1914

A survey of major events and developments in European history from the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. The course will be particularly concerned with how nationalism and imperialism affected Europe internally and influenced its relations with the rest of the world. We will also cover such standard subjects as the Industrial Revolution, Napoleon, and the revolutions of 1848, the rise of Germany, the emergence of mass society and the transformation of culture by technology and science. CIVIC, INFOLIT, and WRITCOM. 

Hist 309 Twentieth-Century Europe

This course will cover European history from 1925 to the 1990’s. Topics to be covered include the legacy of World War I, World War II and the Holocaust, the growth of fascism and totalitarian governments, the creation of the welfare state, and the impact of nationalism on modern European society. HISTRCL, INFOLIT, and WRITCOM. 

Hist 319 Public History Internship

These internships provide students with experience in a public history setting and are ideal for those considering careers involving history in areas outside of teaching.   Typically, these internships take place in museums, historical societies, libraries, archives, living history sites, and oral history projects. Available during fall, spring, and summer terms.  Prerequisite:   Completion of at least one 300 level history course and permission of instructor. 

Hist 322 Women and Gender in European History

This course focuses on the actions, roles, and perceptions of women in European history, with attention to the interaction of gender expectations in regard to women’s economic, political, social, and cultural experiences. GLOBAL, WRITCOM, and INFOLIT. 

Hist 333 Crime and Punishment in European History

Criminal behavior is historically relative, determined by the values and concerns of society at a particular moment in time.  What and how a society chooses to prosecute and punish crime reveals a great deal about the values of that society.  This course explores how European societies, particularly in Britain, have thought about, defined and dealt with crime throughout history.   HISTRCL and INFOLIT. 

Hist 344 Special Topics in European History

This seminar provides an extensive background in European or British history through a close reading of the significant secondary literature of a particular topic or time period. Emphasis is placed on developing the ability to deal critically with historical writing. HISTRCL.  

Hist 348 Urban History

This course will examine the development of the modern city, concentrating on the period from industrialization to the present day (following an introductory historical overview). Emphasis will be placed upon the physical transformations of the city in the modern era, and the implications of those transformations for social relations; the impact of class and racial divisions in the city; perceptions of urban delights and terrors; the growth of suburbia; and the future of cities in a post-industrial landscape. INFOLIT and WRITCOM. 

Hist 358 Constitutional History of the United States

A history of the development and interpretation of American law and politics from the earliest colonial settlements to the present time. Same as Political Science 358. HISTRCL.

Hist 359 Colonial and Revolutionary America

This study of 17th and 18th century North America examines issues like religious toleration, race relations, identity politics, class conflict, immigration, environmental degradation, and property rights through the perspective of Indian, African, and European servants, slaves, artisans, farmers, soldiers, and merchants. Pre-requisite: At least one 200-level history course or permission of the instructor. HISTRCL, CRITTHNK, and INFOLIT.

Hist 363 American Civil War

A survey of the major issues, events and personalities of the American Civil War from the origins of the sectional conflict throughout the ultimate failure of Reconstruction. This course investigates how the war changed the lives of all Americans, including those who never set foot on the battlefield.   CRITTHNK, HISTRCL, and INFOLIT.  

Hist 364 Special Topic(s) in American History

This seminar provides an in-depth understanding of American history through an intensive study of the secondary literature of a particular topic or period. Emphasis is placed on developing the ability to deal critically with historical writing. Prerequisite: At least one 200-level history course or permission of the instructor. HISTRCL.  

Hist 369 Historical Simulation Design

Students will work together to research, design, and write prototypes of several games, which they will playtest and refine over the course of the semester. Prerequisite: At least one 200-level history course. COLLABLDR and ORALCOM. 

Hist 370 Europe and World War I

This course examines aspects of World War I including the causes of the war, military tactics and innovations, the impact of war on both soldiers and civilians, the global impact of the war, the resulting peace treaties, and the depiction of the war in art, literature, and film. Prerequisite: At least one 200-level history course or permission of the instructor. WRITCOM, INFOLIT, and GLOBAL.

Hist 382 RTTP Preceptorship

Students will serve as preceptors for a Reacting to the Past historical simulation in HIST 111 or HIST 112 to mentor and advise students, with particular attention to the OC and CL embedded skills. Prererequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Hist 385 Historiography

A senior seminar which seeks to explore the methodological problems in historical research, followed by a survey of the important theories of history. Against this background in historical interpretation, the course considers selected topics in European and American historiography. Open only to seniors (or juniors with permission) whose major field of concentration is history.