Required Syllabus Elements

Simpson policy requires that each syllabus for an undergraduate course includes the following:

The faculty development office recommends you consider including the following information, even though it is not required:

 

For graduate courses and post-baccalaureate certificates, consult the document at the bottom of the Post-Baccalaureate Curriculum Committee webpage.

 


Contact Hours and Learning Time

Regulations from the U.S. Department of Education have caused all institutions to review and document their policies and practices with regard to assigning academic credit. Simpson College has determined that the learning-time-to-credit equivalence is roughly 35 hours per credit. Thus, for each credit awarded to a course, the students can expect to spend 35 hours in the classroom, participating in instructor-directed activity, or preparing for class.

All syllabi need to include a statement such as one of the following along with the list of learning activities and the number of hours a typical student should expect to spend during the semester on each activity. In addition, please include a brief description detailing the changes that have been made as the course changed from three to four credits.

Example 1: 4 credit semester-long course meeting 3 times per week

This is a four credit course that meets 3 days per week for 60 minutes. It is designed to have learning opportunities and activities totaling approximately 143 hours over the 15 weeks of the course (including finals week).

In class activities: (3 days x 60 minutes x 14 weeks + 2 hours for final class 42 hours
Required Readings and Focus/Extension Exercises: (14 chapters x 3 hours each 42 hours
Midterm take-home exam 5 hours
Final paper and oral presentation 24 hours
Five reflection “papers” (5 x 5 hours each) 25 hours
Preparation for final activity 5 hours
Total 143 hours

 

Example 2: 4 credit semester-long course meeting 3 times per week for 60 minutes and once a week for a 3 hour lab

This is a four credit course that meets 3 days per week for 60 minutes and 1 day per week for 3 hours. It is designed to have learning opportunities and activities totaling approximately 148 hours over the 15 weeks of the course (including finals week).

The designed activities may take each student a different amount of time to finish, however the average will be 148 hours. Further estimates include:

In class activities (3 hours x 14 weeks) 42 hours
In lab activities (3 hours x 14 weeks) 42 hours
Required readings (8 chapter readings x 3 hours each) 24 hours
Research paper (including searching and evaluating research) 30 hours
Lab assignments (10 x 1 hour each) 10 hours
Total 148 hours

 

 

Example 3: 4 credit semester-long course meeting twice a week

This is a four-credit undergraduate course that meets face-to-face twice a week over the semester. It is designed to provide learning time totaling approximately 148 hours over the 15 weeks of the course (including finals week). This estimate is for the typical undergraduate student. Estimates of the time you will need for learning time follow:

In class activities (90 min/class x 2 times/week x 14 weeks + 2 hours for final class) 44 hours
Required readings (8 plays x 4 hours each; 8 artitcles x 1 hour each) 40 hours
Essays (research, draft, supporting materials, conference, and final revision) 40 hours
Forum postings on Scholar 10 hours
Preparation for performance assignment 10 hours
Total 148 hours

 

Example 4: 4 credit course taught completely online for 8 weeks

This is a four credit undergraduate course that “meets” for chat on Tuesdays from 6:00 to 7:00 pm. It is designed to have learning opportunities and activities totaling approximately 140 hours over the 8 weeks of the course – 8 hours in “chat” and 131 hours outside of class. This estimate is for the typical undergraduate student. The designed activities may take one person longer to complete and another person may complete the activities in less time. We are all individuals. Here are some further estimates:

Synchronous chats (8 x 1 hour each): “in class activity” 8 hours
Required readings (12 chapters x 3 hours each) 36 hours
Six weekly papers (6 x 6 hours each) 36 hours
Final paper 32 hours
Asynchronous discussion board activities (7 x 4 hours each): also considered an “in-class” activity 28 hours
Total 140 hours

 

 

Example 5: 4 credit evening course taught in a blended learning format over 8 weeks

This is a four credit graduate course that meets weekly on the Ankeny Campus on Tuesdays from 5:30 to 9:30 pm. It is designed to have learning opportunities and activities totaling approximately 140 hours over the 8 weeks of the course – 32 hours in class and 108 hours outside of class. The designed activities may take one person longer to complete and another person may complete the activities in less time. We are all individuals. Here are some further estimates:

In-class activities 32 hours
Required readings and focus/extension exercises (8 readings x 7 hours each) 56 hours
Midterm take-up exam 20 hours
Written paper and oral presentation 27 hours
Preparation for final activity 5 hours
Total 140 hours

 

 


Academic Integrity. The academic integrity policy should be included on all syllabi.

In all endeavors, Simpson College expects its students to adhere to the strictest standards of honesty and integrity. In keeping with the College’s mission to develop the student’s critical intellectual skills, while fostering personal integrity and moral responsibility, each student is expected to abide by the Simpson College rules for academic integrity. Academic dishonesty includes (but is not limited to) any form of cheating, plagiarism, unauthorized collaboration, misreporting any absence as college-sponsored or college-sanctioned, submitting a paper written in whole or in part by someone else, or submitting a paper that was previously submitted in whole or in substantial part for another class without prior permission. If the student has any questions about whether any action would constitute academic dishonesty, it is imperative that he or she consult the instructor before taking the action. All cases of substantiated academic dishonesty must be reported to the student’s academic advisor and the Dean for Academic Affairs. For further guidance on these rules and their sanctions, please see the college catalog.

 


Course Continuity Plan

Each syllabus should include the appropriate course continuity plan developed by the department and instructor. An example you could use follows.

Should the normal instructional activity on the campus be shortened or interrupted by a campus-wide closing, students will receive information from the instructor or other representative of the college about when and if the course might be continued or completed via Internet, telephone, or United States mail.

 


General Education

If your course can be used in partial fulfillment of any of the requirements of the Engaged Citizenship Curriculum and/or of Cornerstone Studies, the description of those requirements needs to be included in your syllabus. You can copy the relevant requirements below and paste them into your own syllabus.

For each designation in the Engaged Citizenship Curriculum, be sure to include a statement of how the objectives will be met in your particular class. One convenient way of accomplishing this is to use the appropriate syllabus grid available on SC Connect (https://scconnect.simpson.edu/resources/ecc/ECC%20Syllabus%20Grids/Forms/AllItems.aspx).

The designation proposal form that was approved by the faculty contains the information about how the objectives should be met. The approved designation proposal forms are available on SC Connect; just click on Engaged Citizenship Curriculum (ECC) from the list on the right. You can also go to: https://scconnect.simpson.edu/resources/ecc/default.aspx

Area of Engagement: The Arts. The Arts component focuses on learning through participation in artistic creation. By taking a course that engages students in the act of creation, students will develop an understanding of art as a constructed means for communication, designed to reveal certain meanings and ideas or to elicit specific responses. Students are given the opportunity to develop their imaginations and to develop their ability to express themselves.

Through the completion of an AR course, students should be able to

  • express perspectives, concepts and/or ideas through an artistic medium
  • reflect and think critically about one’s own and others’ artistic work(s) employing vocabulary and evaluative skills appropriate to the genre
  • articulate the value of the creative process

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: ______ .

Syllabus grid template for AR

A student who completes a AR course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
AR SLO1. express perspectives, concepts and/or ideas through an artistic medium
AR SLO2. reflect intelligently and think critically about one’s own and others’ artistic work(s) employing vocabulary and evaluative skills appropriate to the genre
AR SLO3. articulate the value of the creative process

 

Area of Engagement: Civic Engagement. Civic Engagement courses focus on citizenship and the rights one gains as a community member. These rights include at a minimum civil liberties, civil rights and the opportunity to participate in the construction of that community through voting, civic conversation, and other forms of participation. Civic engagement involves the values, duties, skills, and responsibilities that are part of positively shaping our communities.

Through completion of a CE course, students should be able to

  • describe information, values, processes and theories that are essential to building just and democratic societies
  • apply the perspective of an academic discipline to civic initiatives
  • articulate the importance of their role in civic engagement

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: ______ .

Syllabus grid template for CE

A student who completes a CE course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
CE SLO1. describe information, values, processes and theories that are essential to building just and democratic societies
CE SLO2. apply the perspective of an academic discipline to civic initiatives
CE SLO3. articulate the importance of their role in civic engagement

 

 

Area of Engagement: Diversity and Power in the U.S. The Diversity and Power in the U.S. requirement prepares students to be engaged citizens by exploring enduring questions about ourselves, civilization, and the world by developing the knowledge, dispositions, and skills necessary to shape and create diverse and just communities in the U.S. It is designed to engage students in recognizing and analyzing the perspective of a less powerful (often minority) group and understanding the differences of experience this power differential engenders.

Through completion of a DP course, students should be able to

  • describe the perspectives and experiences of a less powerful (often minority) group in the U.S.
  • evaluate the social inequities resulting from power differentials via the perspectives of both the advantaged and the disadvantaged groups
  • describe the power differentials between two or more groups within one or more communities in the U.S.

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: ______ .

Syllabus grid template for DP

A student who completes a DP course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
DP SLO1. describe the perspectives and experiences of a less powerful (often minority) group in the U.S.
DP SLO2. describe the power differentials between two or more groups within one or more communities in the U.S.
DP SLO3. evaluate the social inequities resulting from power differentials via the perspectives of both the advantaged and the disadvantaged groups.

 

Area of Engagement: Ethics and Value Inquiry. Ethics and Value Inquiry courses encourage students to think critically about the sources and meanings of their commitments to personal integrity, moral responsibility, and social justice. These courses introduce students to questions about moral values and actions and how they relate to our responsibilities to ourselves and others.

Through completion of an EV course, students should be able to

  • make judgments about values and actions by critical evaluation from a variety of normative perspectives
  • identify and critically evaluate multiple approaches to ethical, moral or values questions
  • articulate and justify values and actions in light of normative theories, logical principles, foundational texts, or traditions
  • articulate and critically assess how various normative perspectives are relevant in contemporary society

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: ______ .

Syllabus grid template for EV

A student who completes a EV course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
EV SLO1. make judgments about values and actions by critical evaluation from a variety of normative perspectives
EV SLO2. identify and critically evaluate multiple approaches to ethical, moral or values questions
EV SLO3. articulate and justify values and actions in light of normative theories, logical principles, foundational texts, or traditions
EV SLO4. articulate and critically assess how various normative perspectives are relevant in contemporary society

 

Area of Engagement: Global Perspectives. Global Perspectives courses engage students in an exploration of societies outside of the United States. While some courses may deal with a specific problem (e.g., global warming, genocide, human rights), others focus on larger trends over the course of time (e.g., art, religion, politics, history, economics, literature). By acquainting students with the diversity of thoughts, beliefs and values of a society external to their own, these courses encourage a greater appreciation of and sensitivity to global diversity.

Through completion of a GP course, students should be able to

  • analyze societal values through cultural practices, products and perspectives
  • identify the challenges and achievements of the culture(s) and society(ies) under study
  • analyze the values of the culture(s) as reflected in the decisions the society(ies) makes

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: ______ .

Syllabus grid template for GP

A student who completes a GP course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
GP SLO1. analyze societal values through cultural practices, products and perspectives
GP SLO2. identify the challenges and achievements of the culture(s) and society(ies) under study
GP SLO3. analyze the values of the culture(s) as reflected in the decisions the society(ies) makes

 

Area of Engagement: Historical Perspectives. The Historical Perspectives in Western Culture component focuses on how Western culture has evolved over time through a range of intellectual, philosophical, religious, and historical currents. A study of the development of Western culture and its past is critical to understand, appreciate or critique it. These courses provide context for the current structures of Western society and assist students in making informed decisions as citizens.

Through completion of an HP course, students should be able to

  • describe the distinctive perspectives of people who lived in the time periods or settings studied
  • analyze the relationship between the past and the present by considering the influence of the past on subsequent events, issues, and ideas
  • relate the subjects under consideration to the broader historical and cultural contexts in which they occurred
  • evaluate and interpret primary sources

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: _____ .

Syllabus grid template for HP

A student who completes a HP course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
HP SLO1. describe the distinctive perspectives of people who lived in the time periods or settings studied
HP SLO2. relate the subjects under consideration to the broader historical and cultural contexts in which they occurred
HP SLO3. analyze the relationship between the past and the present by considering the influence of the past on subsequent events, issues, and ideas
HP SLO4. evaluate and interpret primary sources

 

Area of Engagement: Scientific Reasoning. Scientific Reasoning courses provide experiences working with the methods of science, including hypothesis formation and testing, systematic observation, and analysis of quantitative data. Scientific reasoning–in the natural, behavioral, and social sciences–includes the ability to solve problems through the analysis of quantitative empirical data. These methods help students understand how technology and science may affect their lives in areas such as the environment, medicine, human behavior, and scientific ethics.

Through completion of an SR course, students should be able to

  • investigate and draw conclusions about scientific questions from data and using appropriate empirical methods
  • formulate and communicate questions using the scientific method
  • evaluate scientific information from popular and/or peer-reviewed sources
  • analyze ethical issues related to scientific inquiry

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: _____ .

Syllabus grid template for SR

A student who completes a SR course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
SR SLO1. investigate and draw conclusions about scientific questions from data and using appropriate empirical methods
SR SLO2. formulate and communicate questions using the scientific method
SR SLO3. evaluate scientific information from popular and/or peer-reviewed sources
SR SLO4. analyze ethical and  other conventions, practices, and issues related to scientific inquiry

 

Embedded Skill: Collaborative Leadership. The Collaborative Leadership component increases students’ confidence in working in groups for a shared goal and helps students develop skills and dispositions like team building, delegation, conflict resolution, and effective communication. This skill is essential in a world where problems are complex and interdependent, and where teamwork is often required to unite diverse groups behind a shared goal.

Through completion of a CL course, students should be able to

  • articulate the skills and dispositions necessary to achieve a shared goal
  • apply the skills and dispositions necessary for effective collaboration
  • explain how their strengths and weaknesses in collaboration affect the outcome of a collaborative leadership process

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: _____ .

Syllabus grid template for CL

A student who completes a CL course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
CL SLO1. articulate the skills and dispositions necessary to achieve a shared goal
CL SLO2. apply the skills and dispositions necessary for effective collaboration
CL SLO3. explain how their strengths and weaknesses in collaboration affect the outcome of a collaborative leadership process

 

Embedded Skill: Critical Thinking. Critical Thinking courses develop the lifelong intellectually

disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information that is used to guide beliefs and actions. This skill helps with the ability to make sound arguments based on adequate evidence and to rationally examine and assess one’s own arguments and those of others.

Through completion of a CT course, students should be able to

  • draw conclusions by analyzing information critically
  • generate and articulate an argument supported by appropriate evidence
  • evaluate arguments for validity, bias, unchecked assumptions and/or other appropriate criteria
  • describe the effect of one’s experiences on the development of critical thinking skills

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: _____ .

Syllabus grid template for CT

A student who completes a CT course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
CT SLO1. draw conclusions by analyzing information critically
CT SLO2. generate and articulate an argument supported by appropriate evidence
CT SLO3. evaluate arguments for validity, bias, unchecked assumptions and/or other appropriate criteria
CT SLO4. describe the effect of one’s experiences on the development of critical thinking skills

 

Embedded Skill: Information Literacy. Information Literacy courses cultivate the habit of asking appropriate questions related to an information need and discovering explanations and specific answers to those questions based on evidence. Information literacy, as a methodology and a set of skills, allows and inspires individuals to be life-long learners.

Through completion of an IL course, students should be able to

  • execute a research strategy by identifying search terms and locating relevant information in a variety of resources
  • develop a research strategy by asking relevant questions and refining a research topic
  • evaluate information found through a research strategy for suitability
  • use information responsibly by following copyright laws and guidelines for referencing and citation

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: _____ .

Syllabus grid template for IL

A student who completes a IL course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
IL SLO1. execute a research strategy by identifying search terms and locating relevant information in a variety of resources
IL SLO2. develop a research strategy by asking relevant questions and refining a research topic
IL SLO3. evaluate information found through a research strategy for suitability
IL SLO4. use information responsibly by following copyright laws and guidelines for referencing and citation

 

Embedded Skill: Intercultural Communication. The Intercultural Communication requirement prepares students to understand the world through the eyes and words of others. Courses in this category are designed to put students in direct contact with speakers of languages other than their own, since intercultural communication is a daily reality for much of the earth’s population. This skill encourages students to analyze and reflect on the value of using multiple linguistic resources to access other cultural views.

Through completion of an IC course, students should be able to

  • identify distinctive cultural practices, products and perspectives of the cultures under discussion
  • improve their ability to communicate in a nonnative language about topics of cultural interest
  • evaluate their ability to and the importance of being able to communicate with speakers of another language

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: _____ .

Syllabus grid template for IC

A student who completes a IC course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
IC SLO1. identify distinctive cultural practices, products and perspectives of the cultures under discussion
IC SLO2. improve their ability to communicate in a nonnative language about topics of cultural interest
IC SLO3. evaluate their ability to and the importance of being able to communicate with speakers of another language

 

Embedded Skill: Oral Communication. Oral Communication courses engage students in both formal and informal uses of communication. These courses equip students to comprehend, critique, and analyze information in order to be able to effectively and efficiently communicate their ideas to others. These skills enable individuals to become confident and competent speakers.

Through completion of an OC course, students should be able to

  • communicate orally in response to a prompt
  • evaluate arguments given through oral communication
  • provide credible evidence to support claims and arguments in oral communication
  • organize information logically in oral communication
  • incorporate elements to engage an audience in oral communication

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: ______ .

Syllabus grid template for OC

A student who completes a OC course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
OC SLO1. communicate orally in response to a prompt
OC SLO2. evaluate arguments given through oral communication
OC SLO3. provide credible evidence to support claims and arguments in oral communication
OC SLO4. organize information logically in oral communication
OC SLO5. incorporate elements of persuasion to engage the audience in oral communication

 

Embedded Skill: Quantitative Reasoning. The Quantitative Reasoning component focuses on how to interpret, evaluate, and use various types of quantitative information in order to support a position or argument. It includes the ability to express quantitative information visually, symbolically, numerically and verbally. These courses incorporate practice in reading and using quantitative data, in understanding quantitative evidence and in applying quantitative skills to the solution of real-life problems.

Through completion of a QR course, students should be able to

  • draw inferences, solve problems and make decisions using quantitative methods
  • communicate solutions to quantitative questions in oral or written communication that incorporates symbolic, numeric or graphical representations
  • analyze solutions to quantitative questions for accuracy, precision, suitability and/or other appropriate criteria
  • describe the value, limitations and/or implications of quantitative decision making

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: ______ .

Syllabus grid template for SR

A student who completes a SR course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
SR SLO1. draw inferences, solve problems and make decisions using quantitative methods
SR SLO2. communicate solutions to quantitative questions in oral or written communication that incorporates symbolic, numeric or graphical representations
SR SLO3. analyze solutions to quantitative questions for accuracy, precision, suitability and/or other appropriate criteria
SR SLO4. describe the value, limitations and/or implications of quantitative decision making

 

Embedded Skill: Written Communication. Written Communication courses promote strong writing skills that students need in order to comprehend, analyze, and synthesize a variety of texts in a variety of disciplines. These courses teach students to write in multiple contexts, whether they are exploring and developing their own ideas, responding fairly and responsibly to the ideas and perspectives of others, or crafting polished, compelling and persuasive texts.

Through completion of a WC course, students should be able to

  • articulate an idea and formulate a thesis as appropriate to the discipline
  • identify and correct errors in grammar and/or style in written communication
  • provide credible evidence to support claims and arguments in written communication
  • organize thoughts in a logical fashion in written communication
  • incorporate elements of written communication that address the needs of a specific audience in written communication

These objectives will be met through the following assignments and activities: _____

Syllabus grid template for WC

A student who completes a WC course will be able to …

Student Learning Objective (SLO) Class activities directly related to this SLO Student work to be evaluated for this SLO
WC SLO1. articulate an idea and formulate a thesis as appropriate to the discipline
WC SLO2. identify and correct errors in grammar and/or style in written communication
WC SLO3. provide credible evidence to support claims and arguments in written communication
WC SLO4. organize thoughts in a logical fashion in written communication
WC SLO5. incorporate elements of written communication that address the needs of a specific audience in written communication

 

 


Program-Level Student Learning Outcomes

Every major and program at Simpson has a set of student learning outcomes (SLOs). These SLOs are listed in the program’s assessment plan. The curriculum map that is included in the assessment plan identifies which SLOs are associated with which courses. Syllabi should include the program-level SLO’s associated with the course. Contact your department chair if you aren’t sure which SLO’s are associated with a particular course.

 

Accommodations for Students with Accessibility Needs

Although there is no requirement to include information about accommodations, it’s good practice to include this information in your syllabi.  What follows is an example of how you might do this:

I want everyone in this class to be successful. If you have a physical, sensory, learning, or psychological disability that can interfere with your learning, I want you to receive the accommodations to which you are entitled by law. In order for me to do provide accommodations to a student, the student’s disability must be documented with the Student Accessibility Office.  I cannot assist a student with accommodations that I don’t know are needed, so if you need something, please make sure that you either contact me or that you ask Pat Kelley, Student Accessibility Coordinator, to do so on your behalf.  If you have any further questions on the policies and services for students with disabilities, please refer to the academic catalog or go to http://simpson.edu/academics/student-accessibility/.

 

Inclusive Excellence Statement

“We have much we can do to improve our diversity and inclusion efforts at Simpson, but I heard an overwhelming commitment to work toward that end.” – President Jay Simmons, e-mail to students, faculty, and staff on November 13, 2015.

One thing instructors can do is include in the syllabus a statement about the value of diversity or the importance of inclusive excellent. Here are several sample statements gleaned from the web.

From the College of Education at the University of Iowa

Respect for Diversity: It is my intent that students from all diverse backgrounds and perspectives be well-served by this course, that students’ learning needs be addressed both in and out of class, and that the diversity that students bring to this class be viewed as a resource, strength and benefit. It is my intent to present materials and activities that are respectful of diversity: gender, sexual orientation, disability, age, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, race, culture, perspective, and other background characteristics. Your suggestions about how to improve the value of diversity in this course are encouraged and appreciated. Please let me know ways to improve the effectiveness of the course for you personally or for other students or student groups.

In addition, in scheduling exams, I have attempted to avoid conflicts with major religious holidays. If, however, I have inadvertently scheduled an exam or major deadline that creates a conflict with your religious observances, please let me know as soon as possible so that we can make other arrangements.

From Winona State University

WSU recognizes that our individual differences can deepen our understanding of one another and the world around us, rather than divide us. In this class, people of all ethnicities, genders and gender identities, religions, ages, sexual orientations, disabilities, socioeconomic backgrounds, regions, and nationalities are strongly encouraged to share their rich array of perspectives and experiences.  If you feel your differences may in some way isolate you from WSU’s community or if you have a need of any specific accommodations, please speak with the instructor early in the semester about your concerns and what we can do together to help you become an active and engaged member of our class and community.

From California State University, CSU Chico

I am firmly committed to diversity and equality in all areas of campus life, including specifically members of the LGBTQ community. In this class I will work to promote an anti-discriminatory environment where everyone feels safe and welcome. I recognize that discrimination can be direct or indirect and take place at both institutional and personal levels. I believe that such discrimination is unacceptable and I am committed to providing equality of opportunity for all by eliminating any and all discrimination, harassment, bullying, or victimization. The success of this policy relies on the support and understanding of everyone in this class. We all have a responsibility not to be offensive to each other, or to participate in, or condone harassment or discrimination of any kind.

From Purdue University’s Diversity and Inclusion webpage

In this course, each voice in the classroom has something of value to contribute. Please take care to respect the different experiences, beliefs, and values expressed by students and staff involved in this course. We support Purdue’s commitment to diversity, and welcome individuals of all ages, backgrounds, citizenships, disabilities, sex, education, ethnicities, family statuses, genders, gender identities, geographical locations, languages, military experience, political views, races, religions, sexual orientations, socioeconomic statuses, and work experiences.

From Centenary College of Louisiana come two sample diversity statements

Centenary College of Louisiana—and your professor—value human diversity in all its richly complex and multi-faceted forms, whether expressed through race and ethnicity, culture, political and social views, religious and spiritual beliefs, language and geographic characteristics, gender, gender identities and sexual orientations, learning and physical abilities, age, and social or economic classes. Enrich yourself by practicing respect. For questions, concerns, or more information, contact your professor and/or Centenary’s Diversity Chair, listed here: http://www.centenary.edu/globalengagement/diversity.

OR

We value human diversity in all its richly complex and multi-faceted forms, whether expressed through race and ethnicity, culture, political and social views, religious and spiritual beliefs, language and geographic characteristics, gender, gender identities and sexual orientations, learning and physical abilities, age, and social or economic classes. We respect the value of every member of the class, and everyone in the class is encouraged to share his or her unique perspective as an individual, not as a representative of any category. Multicultural and intercultural awareness and competencies are key leadership skills, and we intend to present material and classroom activities that respect and celebrate diversity of thought, background, and experience. College is supposed to challenge assumptions and to provide new and sometimes uncomfortable ways of looking at issues, but if you feel uncomfortable regarding content or perspectives that are presented or discussed by professors, guest speakers, or other students we encourage you to contact one of your instructors immediately so that we can discuss those feelings. We would like to use your preferred language when addressing you, so please let us know if your preferred name (or the pronunciation of that name) differ from what we are using and we ask that each of you let us know your preferred gender pronouns. Your suggestions on how to incorporate diversity in this course in a meaningful way are appreciated and encouraged.

From South Plains College Course Common Syllabus of MUSI 1306 Music Appreciation

Diversity Statement: In this class, the teacher will establish and support an environment that values and nurtures individual and group differences and encourages engagement and interaction. Understanding and respecting multiple experiences and perspectives will serve to challenge and stimulate all of us to learn about others, about the larger world and about ourselves. By promoting diversity and intellectual exchange, we will not only mirror society as it is, but also model society as it should and can be.

Consider issues of diversity as you plan your spring courses. Penn State has a nice checklist of things to consider at https://www.schreyerinstitute.psu.edu/pdf/DiversityChecklist.pdf.

 

Explanation of Plagiarism

The academic integrity statement is a required element in all syllabi, but if you are going to ask your students to write papers, you may also want to include information about plagiarism. Here are a variety of sample plagiarism statements available online.

From the Yale University Center for Teaching and Learning

You must document all of your source material. If you take any text from somebody else, you must make it clear the text is being quoted and where the text comes from. You must also cite any sources from which you obtain numbers, ideas, or other material. If you have any questions about what does or does not constitute plagiarism, ask! Plagiarism is a serious offense and will not be treated lightly. Fortunately, it is also easy to avoid and if you are the least bit careful about giving credit where credit is due you should not run into any problems.

George Mason University provides the following information

Plagiarism means using the exact words, opinion, or factual information from another person without giving that person credit. Writers give credit through the use of accepted documentation styles, such as parenthetical citation, footnotes, or end notes; a simple listing of books and articles is not sufficient. Plagiarism is the equivalent of intellectual robbery and cannot be tolerated in an academic setting.

Student writers are often confused as to what should be cited. Some think that only direct quotations need to be credited. While direct quotations do need citations, so do paraphrases and summaries of opinions or factual information formerly unknown to the writers or which the writers did not discover themselves. Exceptions to this include factual information which can be obtained from a variety of sources, the writer’s own insights or findings from their own field research, and what has been termed common knowledge. What constitutes common knowledge can sometimes be precarious, and what is common knowledge for one audience may be so for another. In such situations, it is helpful to keep the reader in mind and to think of citations as being reader friendly. In other words, writers provide a citation for any piece of information that they think their readers might want to investigate further. Not only is this attitude considerate of readers and establishes credibility, it will almost certainly ensure that writers will never be guilty of plagiarism.

You may also use or adapt the following:

According to the Excelsior OWL, “plagiarism means to take the words, ideas, or analysis that some other person has written and represent them as their own words, ideas, or analysis” (http://owl.excelsior.edu/posts/view/405). Plagiarism is determined by comparing your writing to the original source; whether you intended to plagiarize is not relevant. If you use the words written by someone else, you need to put quotation marks around those words as well as provide a citation. If you paraphrase someone else’s words, you are still using that person’s ideas. When paraphrasing, be sure to include a citation. In addition, be sure that your paraphrase is really in your words and uses your own sentence structure. Dropping a few words and replacing a few words with synonyms does not count as paraphrasing.

In this class, you should use APA style for your in-text citations and your reference section.


Sexual Misconduct and Title IX

Simpson College strives to create an environment free from sexual or relationship misconduct of any kind; and in which those who have experienced sexual misconduct get the help and support they need.  Simpson’s Sexual and Relationship Misconduct Policy outlines expectations the college has students and employees, including faculty. In order to do all that we can to maintain a safe campus community, and in compliance with Federal law, all employees of the college are expected to report knowledge of alleged sexual misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator.  Therefore, if you reveal to me, in conversation, writing, class discussion, or in any other manner, that you have experienced sexual misconduct it is my obligation to share that information with the Title IX Coordinator on our campus.  Please know that if this is a step that needs to be taken, I will do my best to involve you in that process so that you know what to expect as a result of the communication with the Title IX Coordinator. To learn more about the expectations the college has of you with respect to sexual misconduct, you can find the full policy here: http://simpson.edu/sexual-and-relationship-misconduct-policy/

Last Updated: 8/29/16