Upcoming Course Offerings

Students engaged in negotiation during the French Revolution Reacting to the Past game

Students engaged in negotiation during the French Revolution Reacting to the Past game in HIST 112

Spring 2015

  • HIST 102 - Western Civilization II
  • HIST 112 - Western Civilization II (Reacting to the Past)
  • HIST 190 - World War II
  • HIST 202 - US History since 1877
  • HIST 222 - American Women's History
  • HIST 275 - History of India
  • HIST 290 - Special Topics in History: Rome
  • HIST 364 - Special Topic(s) in American History
  • HIST 369 - Historical Simulation Design
  • HIST 370 - Europe and World War I

Fall 2015

  • HIST 101 - Western Civilization I
  • HIST 111 - Western Civilization (Reacting to the Past)
  • HIST 190 - Royal Murder Mystery (Richard III)
  • HIST 201 - US to 1877
  • HIST 231 - England to 1688
  • HIST 264 - Special Topic in American History: Photohistory
  • HIST 333 - Crime and Punishment in European History
  • HIST 363 - American Civil War
  • HIST 385 - Historiography (Senior Capstone)

Spring 2015 Courses

HIST 102 – History of Western Civilization II

Beginning with the early modern era, the survey of Western civilization continues during the second semester with a consideration of the changes wrought by the Intellectual and Scientific Revolution, English ferment, the French Revolution, and the growth of modern industry and nationalism. The course concludes with an examination of the great world upheavals of the twentieth century.   CRITTHNK and CIVIC.

HIST 112 – Reacting to the Past Western Civilization II 

This course is an introduction to the western tradition through reading, discussion, lecture, and historical simulation games.  Students will play one or more multi-week historical simulations as part of the course.  Beginning with the early modern era, the survey of Western civilization continues during the second semester with a consideration of the changes wrought by the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and the growth of modern industry and nationalism. The course concludes with an examination of the great world upheavals of the twentieth century.  COLLABLDR and ORALCOM. 

  • What’s the difference between HIST 102 and 112?   In 102, you’ll probably have a textbook, but you’ll also spend time reading and discussing primary sources.  HIST 112 is taught in a ‘Great Books’ format where you read longer primary sources, including classic works on philosophy, religion and literature, and can expect to have lots of discussions as well as engage in a role-playing game.

HIST 190 – Special Topic: World War II

This seminar examines the Second World War from a variety of angles, which provides an excellent introduction to the discipline of history as it is practiced at the college level. Students will be introduced to a variety of historical methodologies including document analysis, primary source research, and historical role-playing games. HISTRCL and INFOLIT.  Preference given to first and second year students.

HIST 202 –US Since 1877 

An introductory analysis of the factors, which have defined our history from the Reconstruction after the Civil War to America's position in the twentieth century.  Emphasis on industrialization, urbanization, and the emergence of the United States as a world power in the twentieth century.  HISTRCL and INFOLIT. 

HIST 275 – History of India

A survey of the history of the Indian subcontinent, with emphasis on the period from the Mughal Empire to independence and partition. Topics include Hindu and Muslim traditions, caste, imperialism, Indian nationalism, the life and ideas of Gandhi, and decolonization and its aftermath.   COLLABLDR, GLOBAL, and ORALCOM.

HIST 290 – Special Topic: Rome 

This course is an overview of the city’s mythological founding and development into a republic. An emphasis will be placed upon the political and social aspects of its transition to an empire. The Empire will be studied for its longevity and as the birthplace of Christianity. The class concludes with an examination of Ancient Rome’s impact and continued influence on the modern world.

HIST 364 – Special Topic: Religion in America 

The United States is the most religiously diverse country in the world. This course will examine how American religious pluralism came to be one of the nation’s defining characteristics. Topics covered include Puritans, revivals, Mormons, the Founding Fathers, the Ghost Dance, and Italian-American Catholicism. Students will learn how to read historical monographs and write academic book reviews.  Prerequisite: one 200 level History course or permission of instructor

HIST 370 – Europe and WWI 

This course examines aspects of World War I including the causes of the war, military tactics and innovations, the impact of war on both soldiers and civilians, the global impact of the war, the resulting peace treaties, and the depiction of the war in art, literature, and film. WRITCOM, INFOLIT, and GLOBAL. Prerequisite: one 200 level History course or permission of instructor

HIST 369 – Historical Simulation Design

Students will work together to research, design, and write prototypes of several games, which they will playtest and refine over the course of the semester. COLLABLDR and ORALCOM.  Prerequisite: one 200 level History course or permission of instructor

Fall 2015 Courses

HIST 101 – History of Western Civilization I

A brief examination of cultural contributions of the ancient Middle East, followed by a survey of the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome and an investigation of the rise of Christianity.  A survey of the Middle Ages serves as a background for the development of European life culminating in the era of the Renaissance and Reformation.  CIVIC, and CRITTHNK. 

HIST 111  Reacting to the Past Western Civilization

This course is an introduction to the western tradition through reading, discussion, lecture, and historical simulation games.  Students will play one or more multi-week historical simulations as part of the course.  The course will cover the ancient Middle East, the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome, the development of Christianity, medieval Europe, and the Renaissance and Reformation.  COLLABLDR and ORALCOM. 

HIST 190 – Royal Murder Mystery

Two little boys, one a prince, the other an uncrowned king of England, disappeared from the Tower of London in 1483, never to be seen or heard from again. The man accused of their mysterious murder was none other than their uncle, the man who took the throne and made himself King of England, Richard III. But no one has been able to prove that Richard actually did it. So here we have a real ‘whodunit’ that this course will attempt to unravel. You will explore the case, the cast of suspects and the relevant history to try to solve this murder mystery. Acting as detectives, you will examine the historical evidence, comb through contemporary documents, and question literature and historical interpretations to construct solutions to the mystery. Preference given to first and second year students.

HIST 201 – US to 1877 An examination of the forces which have shaped American history from the earliest colonial settlements to the Civil War. Emphasis upon the American Revolution, the establishment of the government under the Constitution, and the succeeding political, social, and economic movements which culminated in the Civil War. HISTRCL, and INFOLIT

HIST 231 – England to 1688

This course will explore the development of England from the Norman conquest in 1066 to the Glorious Revolution in 1688. This period was fraught with changes as monarchs struggled to gain control of the unruly island and establish a powerful centralized monarch. The primary focus of the course will be the political and religious interactions of the Crown, the Church and its nobility, and the contributions made towards the emergence of England as a Protestant constitutional monarchy.

HIST 364 Special Topic in American History: Photohistory

This course studies the history of the United States using photography as a primary source. A few photographers who will be considered are Matthew Brady, Robert Frank, and Walker Evans. A necessary by-product of using photographs as historical artifacts, students will learn about the history of photography in America as well as how to read photographs for their historical significance. Students will complete an original research project on a topic of their choice using photographs as their primary source. Prerequisite: one 200 level History course or permission of instructor

HIST 333   Crime and Punishment in European History Crime and its punishment have always held a fascination for the public and yet we very seldom think about what crime is or how it is defined. Criminal behavior is historically relative, determined by the values and concerns of society at a particular moment in time. What and how a society chooses to prosecute and punish crime reveals a great deal about the values of that society. Through the examination of such crimes as murder, witchcraft and theft, we can see how societal anxieties underlay the prosecution of crime. This course will explore the nature of crime and criminality in the context of English history from the early modern to the Victorian era. HISTRCL and INFOLIT. Prerequisite: one 200 level History course or permission of instructor 

HIST 363   American Civil War A survey of the major issues, events and personalities of the American Civil War from the origins of the sectional conflict throughout the ultimate failure of Reconstruction. This course investigates how the war changed the lives of all Americans, including those who never set foot on the battlefield.   CRITTHNK, HISTRCL, and INFOLIT. Prerequisite: one 200 level History course or permission of instructor