Carver Cultural Center

Carver Cultural Center

Carver Cultural Center

Carver Cultural Center, formerly known as the Afro-American Cultural Center, represents the ideals of a generation that believed in social justice and equal representation among students at campus.

During the late 60’s and the civil rights movement that emerged in the whole country, a strong number of changes occurred as part of the African-American community drive for identity and equal representation at Simpson College. Pushed by the Black Students Organization (later renamed Organization for Black Unity) and their demands for a Black Student Center, President Ralph John recognized that it was necessary to have a place on campus that granted comfort for the students. On March 16, 1969 with a big opening ceremony and to the rhythm of African drum music, the College-owned property at the corner of West Girard Street and D Street was inaugurated as the Afro-American Cultural Center[1].

(The Afro-American Cultural Center)… “Represents the struggle that Black students have endured and must continue to endure.” – A student’s views about the house for the yearbook, in 1974[2].

As part of a renovation period, on November 4, 1982, the Afro-American Cultural Center was moved from its place on North C Street to a new location on 609 North D Street. Under another big ceremony attended by a big number of students, faculty members and local residents of the area the new house, now renamed under George Washington Carver as “Carver Cultural Center”, was opened to the public[3].

Nowadays the house provides housing for students interested in promoting multicultural activities on campus. The residents of the house are from unique backgrounds living together and organizing events to continue the traditions of the Carver Cultural Center promoting multi-cultural unity, respect, and self-consciousness.

-For more information please refer to the book “Beneath the Whispering Maples: The History of Simpson College”. 

 

 

[1] Walt Joseph, Beneath the Whispering Maples: The History of Simpson College (Indianola: The Simpson College Press, 1995), 565.

[2] Zenith, 1974 , 42.

[3] Walt Joseph, Beneath the Whispering Maples: The History of Simpson College (Indianola: The Simpson College Press, 1995), 672.