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Campus Buildings

Amy Robertson Music Center Kent Campus Center
Art Center Maple House
Art Studio Mary Berry Hall
Blank Performing Arts Center McNeill Hall
Brenton Student Center Pfeiffer Dining Hall
Carver Science Center Physical Plant
College Hall Smith Memorial Chapel
Dunn Library Steven Johnson Fitness Center
Hillman Hall Upward Bound House
  Wallace Hall
   

Amy Robertson Music Center

Amy Robertson Music Center

This 1.8 million-dollar facility was dedicated in the spring of 1983 and named for Amy Robertson, Class of 1921. The Lekberg Recital Hall seats 250 people and is used for student and faculty recitals as well as small-group presentations. The center also contains faculty offices, individual practice rooms and instrumental music facilities. A $1 million addition was completed in the spring of 1997. The Salsbury Hall of Music features a choral rehearsal room, including a listening library, teaching studios and a large classroom.
Kent Campus Center Kent Campus Center was completed in October 2012. It is a 54,000 square foot campus hub and is located in the same location as the Brenton Student Center. Kent Campus Center is a place where student can spend their free time or get food at one of three food places.

Art Center

Art Center

The Art Center was formally known as the Carnegie Library. The building was built in 1905, as one of two Carnegies in Indianola. In 1964, the library moved to Dunn and the house was renovated to house the Business Department in 1975. In the early 1920’s, it was renamed Heckert Hall after Josiah B. Heckert. Today it houses classrooms and offices for the Art Department.

Maple House

Maple House

The Maple House was established in July 2003 for Lilly Initiative and Upward Bound offices.  It is now the Kate Shelley Women’s Resource Center (KSWRC).

Art Studio

Art Studio

In the fall of 2006, pottery and other studio art classes are held in the Simpson Art Studios east of campus.

Mary Berry Hall

Mary Berry

Ladies Hall was completed in 1891 and served as the college’s women’s dorm before Kresge was built. In 1908, it was remodeled and renamed Mary Berry in memory of Simpson student and daughter of former president Thomas S. Berry who passed away in 1902. It currently houses the English, History, Philosophy Political Science, Religion, Psychology and World Language Departments. The lower level has classrooms and offices. The second floor contains classrooms and faculty offices. The third floor has more offices and the Farnham Art Gallery, which displays visiting art exhibits as well as the work of Simpson art students.

Blank Performing Arts Center

Blank Performing Arts Center

Named for Dr. and Mrs. A. H. Blank, this building was completed in 1971 to house the Theatre Arts Department. Located in Blank are the 125-seat Barnum Studio Theatre and the 500-seat Pote Theatre, where the Des Moines Metro Opera performs its summer season. Guest artists and senior art students can display their work in the Barborka Gallery. Blank also contains a workshop and costume shop, as well as offices and classrooms.

Brenton Student Center

Brenton Student Center

The BSC was dedicated in February 1968 and named in honor of Mr. and Mrs. W. Harold Brenton. BSC offers lounges and meeting rooms for various organizations, as well as the offices of Student Development, Career and Counseling Services, Campus Security and the nurse. Students can send mail and check their student mailboxes here. BSC also houses the Storm Street Grill, an alternative to Pfeiffer Dining Hall. Several student organizations are based in BSC, including The Zenith (the yearbook) and KSTM (the radio station) as well as the Student Government Association.

Pfeiffer Dining Hall

Pfeiffer Dining Hall

Constructed in 1954, this new two-story student union was called Annie Merner Pfeiffer Hall. In the summer of 2001, this building was completely renovated. Several meal plans are available for students to choose from, and the dining hall features food stations offering a wide variety of options. Above Pfeiffer is Great Hall. This large room is used to hold dances, convocations, lectures, recitals, banquets and numerous other student gatherings.

Carver Science Center

Carver Science Building

Dedicated in October 1956, this building is named after George Washington Carver, one of Simpson’s most famous alumni. In 1993 Carver Science Center underwent a $9 million expansion and renovation, which added research facilities, classrooms and offices. The building houses the Mathematics and Computer Science Departments as well as the Biology & Environmental Science and Chemistry & Physics Departments. Also located in Carver are various science labs, including a cadaver lab. Three computer labs are located on the ground floor.

Physical Plant

Physical Plant

The Physical plant hosts Simpson College Campus Services.

College Hall

College Hall

Completed in 1870, College Hall is the oldest building on Simpson’s campus, with its last major remodeling in 1986. It held Simpson’s first classrooms and served as the original chapel. It was known for decades as Old Chapel. Now it holds administrative offices and meeting rooms. The Office of Admissions is located on the first floor. The Matthew Simpson Room, a formal reception hall for alumni and college gatherings, occupies the second floor. The third floor holds the Red and Gold Room as well as the Office of the Financial Assistance.

Smith Memorial Chapel

Smith Chapel

This building, dedicated in October 1968, is the focal point of religious activities at Simpson. It was named in memory of Mrs. Annie Catherine Smith and Henry Gardner Smith. The chapel contains a mobile pipe organ, one of seven in the world, that can be played through the carillon in the bell tower and provide music for the entire campus. Smith Chapel is used for campus worship, Madrigal Choir concerts and Honors Convocation among other events. Dirlam Lounge, with a cozy fireplace and couches, is used for small-group discussions and meetings. It also houses Holy Grounds, the campus coffee shop. Smith Chapel is also equipped with several classrooms and a music listening lab on the lower level.

Dunn Library

Dunn Library

The library was completed in 1964 and named in honor of Rex A. Dunn, a Simpson alumnus. Collections include books, journals, scores, DVDs, and CDs; e-books, e-journals and a multitude of e-resources are available through the library’s web site. Dunn features group study rooms, individual carrels, and comfy chairs and couches. The Research Consultation office (part of The Center for Academic Resources), computer lab, and the Edwards Center (EMERGE) are on the first floor. The Avery Craven Room, on the second floor, houses an Antebellum South collection, as well as the Lehmann Collection of Ancient Pottery. Classrooms, the general book collection, and teacher education materials are also on the second floor. The third floor includes quiet study spaces, Student Support Services, and the Walt Research Library & Simpson College Archives. The first library building, the Carnegie Library located by Mary Berry Hall, was completed in 1907 with Carnegie funds and was taken down in June 2014.
Steven Johnson Fitness Center The Steven Johnson Fitness Center opened in January of 2014. The fitness center is a two-tier workout facility consisting of a 5,500 square foot strength and conditioning center and a 4,500 square foot exercise and fitness center. The renovation also includes classroom and meeting space, administrative and academic suites, expanded wrestling room, a cheer, dance and multipurpose room, new Hall of Fame display, an exercise science and athletic training lab and a Swim Ex rehabilitation and therapy pool.

Hillman Hall

Hillman Hall

The Central Building was completed in 1920 to house administration and classrooms. It was renamed Hillman Hall in 1961 to honor John L. Hillman, Simpson’s longest serving president (1919-1936). It currently holds administrative offices, the Continuing & Graduate Programs and Conferencing. The business and registrar’s offices are located on the first floor. The second floor houses the offices of the president, and academic dean, as well as human resources, college advancement and alumni. The third floor is occupied by public relations. Hillman is connected to McNeill Hall by a convenient commuter lounge.
Upward Bound House The Upward Bound program is located in the Maple House, which is now known as the Kate Shelley Women’s Resource Center. Located at the corner of N D and Girard or 711 N D. The Upward Bound Program is a federal TRIO program funded by the U.S. Department of Education. This program provides opportunities for participants to succeed in their precollege performance and ultimately in their higher education pursuits.

Wallace Hall

Wallace Hall

The Science Hall was built in 1888 and housed a museum, music rooms, laboratories, library, classrooms and art studio. It was renamed in 1967 for Henry A. Wallace, geneticist and former vice president of United States and housed geology, mathematics and physics. It now serves as the headquarters of the Education and Sociology Departments.